Founding Concepts from our Earliest Days Still Ring True Today

This year, Fathom Consulting celebrates 20 years in business. In addition to happenings planned throughout the year, we’re sharing a series of blog posts to celebrate the last two decades and the years to come. This is the second in the series.

On May 7, 1999, Robin Carpenter and Jan Oldenburg founded Evantage Consulting with a focus on bridging strategy, technology, and the customer experience.

Let me quickly set the scene on what was happening as our organization was founded at the cusp of Y2K mania. The internet was gaining traction as a force to be reckoned with (for most businesses). For the first time, IT and marketing teams were required to work together on things like ecommerce and web-based products and services. The inherent messiness of how organizations worked (or didn’t!) was getting exposed to customers, and it wasn’t pretty.

Robin and Jan had hybrid backgrounds, having spent time in marketing, operations, and technology—and they saw an opportunity to integrate the voice of the customer, which could serve as a neutral way to help make decisions about what to do in this new internet world.  While it is more common today, the integration of the customer experience was truly visionary at the time.

Since our founding, a few things have changed. We have evolved our brand to Fathom Consulting. We’ve moved our offices to accommodate a growing team and foster collaboration with our clients and each other. We’ve deepened our research, concepting, and prototyping toolkits, and tackled organizational and operational challenges that span enterprises, not just departments. We’ve also largely stopped talking about “digital” as something different and unique. Even in this era of “digital transformation,” we believe success lies within deeply understanding and delivering on what customers and employees need—with digital as an integrated partof the holistic, system-wide solution—not the endgame.

However, some founding concepts remain the same after 20 years in business. Early in my tenure at then-Evantage, I remember Jan sharing a perspective that made an impact on me. The idea was this: the interesting stuff happens at the intersections of things—at the boundaries, edges and bridges. I remember thinking how true that is,  how important it is to pay attention to those spaces, and get really good at tackling problems and driving new thinking by understanding the multiple perspectives coming together. This sentiment guides our work today—in terms of who we hire (hybrids!) and the kinds of problems we solve for clients.

On May 7, 2019, Fathom still thrives at the intersection of strategy, technology and customers. We are still owned and led by women. We still have a great time working with our colleagues. And we still look boldly ahead to the exciting opportunities that await us in the future.

20 Years of People Propelling Success

This May, Fathom Consulting celebrates 20 years in business. In addition to happenings planned throughout the year (looking at you staff, clients, partners, and alumni), this is the first post in a series to celebrate the last two decades and the years to come.

At the top of my list of things to celebrate? Our consultants—modern-day renaissance professionals who move our clients from complexity to confidence. From our start as Evantage Consulting in 1999, the most important ingredient in our recipe for success has been our smart, creative, low-ego, and collaborative team.

Anyone who has spent time with us knows we’re constantly striving to push the bar higher in all that we do—from client projects, to the perfect team building event, to fine-tuning the mechanics of a well-constructed team.

For many years, we hired largely on instinct. While that served us well – our average employee tenure is over 7.5 years – we recognized it was time to mature our process. With nearly half the company weighing in at some point, we dove deep into giving our hiring process an overhaul.

Like we might approach a project for a client, we took a step back, clarified our objectives, and collaborated to arrive at the specifics of what we needed to do on the hiring front. While it wasn’t necessary for us to develop a fancy tool or a magical test that puts Myers-Briggs to shame, we worked to formalize a process that candidates now follow, including a:

  • Personal capabilities presentation
  • Case study review
  • Hypothetical project approach
  • Conversation with a team of potential peers

As we started to use the new process, we found it to do just what we hoped for: enable our team and candidates alike to have a realistic mutual understanding of one another before taking the next step. With a small, high-performing team like ours, we know this deeper level of knowledge from both parties is essential to ultimate success.

As part of this effort, we also articulated the traits of the consultants who are successful at Fathom, to help guide our efforts to seek out future hires. We look for people who are:

Leaders
At Fathom, leadership means having at least 10 years of experience. It means consultants feel at home in a self-directed environment. It means team members thrive on solving problems creatively with actionable solutions that really work. And it means people leading the charge without ego getting in the way.

Hybrids
By definition, “hybrid” refers to combining two different elements in a mixture. Bringing a mix of experiences to the table enables consultants at Fathom to appreciate the variety of perspectives that often arise in client work. For example, team members have backgrounds that might include roles inside an organization and at an agency, or experience in marketing and information technology.

Curious, analytical, and continuous learners
Changing things for the better—for our team, our clients, or our community—requires consultants to have a desire for absorbing and producing new ideas. To foster meaningful and lasting change, all team members are encouraged to investigate new things, and share these passions and interests with the rest of the group.

Naturals at WOO (Winning Others Over)
Understanding how to connect with people is critical for team members. “Nerds with solid social skills” is something we consistently joke about, yet it’s really true. Consultants aren’t afraid to go deep and get geeky, and are able to communicate these passions effectively.

Once we identify the desired traits are a match, we consider fit with not only current clients and projects, but also with where we see market and client trends heading. Finding the next great addition to our team takes time and it shouldn’t be rushed. Our updated hiring process makes it a priority to set expectations (for ourselves and candidates) that determining mutual fit takes some time—and that’s OK.

For me, one of the joys of working with a team with this collection of traits is that we are always evolving and pushing upward – as individuals and as a team. We always encourage one another to evolve and improve. During my time at Fathom, I’ve been shaped and inspired by my respected colleagues. As consultants, people are the tools of our trade, and I know that finding talented humans that are the right match for our team is essential for success as I look toward the next 20 years.

Reflecting on Business, Leadership and Resiliency in the New Year

This time of year is natural for reflection, taking stock of the past and establishing goals and making plans for the future. It’s a perfect time to set your intention for the year ahead. When managing change—in your organization or your personal life—reflection represents an opportunity to assign meaning to the successes and missteps of the past year, enabling you to become more resilient and steadier as you embark on a new one.

Taking time to reflect is one of the most important things I do as a leader. Whether I’m looking to make big changes in the coming year or just thinking about how I want to approach this year’s team building event, clearing the time and space to really listen to myself helps me to create clarity and enables new connections that allow me to be an effective leader.

Here are some of the questions I always find helpful as I take time to reflect and begin to look forward:

  • What are your unique strengths and how will you build on those? As a believer in an appreciative, strengths-based approach to life, I know there is great value in understanding and building on your own strengths (and those of your team), rather than focusing on gaps. Take the time to “inventory” your personal and your organizational strengths and think about how you can amplify those to benefit your leadership style and your business’ bottom line.
  • What problems do you really need to solve in the year ahead? Or even the next few months? Too often I see people focused on what outcomes they must deliver or what projects they have to get done. I’m asking a bigger question. Whether you have challenges with personnel, customer service, organizational development or something else, prioritize the difficulties that, if left unchecked, will have the biggest negative impact on your business.
  • What would need to be true to solve those problems? This question enables expansive thinking. Business rarely conforms to the ideal, which makes plotting a problem-solving course even more difficult. Consider how your organization, in the most ideal circumstances, will mitigate challenges in the new year. Will solving problems require a more connected and engaged team? A new approach to marketing? Letting go of something you’ve “always done”? Then, how will you as a leader implement the changes needed to solve the challenges ahead?
  • How can you best “show up” for your organization? Creating resiliency and managing change is a daily priority for business leaders. Taking time and energy for reflection is one of the ways leaders can “show up” in support of their organizational goals, hopes, and dreams. I recently came across a metaphor about leaders “getting on the balcony” – taking yourself out of the day-to-day and focusing efforts on the business instead of in the business. By standing on the balcony, leaders can gain valuable perspective and assess how the organization is working instead of just what the business is “working on.”

 

Self-reflection is not just an exercise for your business; it’s like scheduled maintenance for your leadership ability. With the fast-paced speed of life and work, it takes planning and diligence to ensure you are making the time to do it. The goal of reflection is not about generating a to-do list what you will do next—it’s about creating time and space, thinking deeply, and clarifying how you will approach the future with an open mind and a mental roadmap for navigating personal and professional pitfalls. Are you ready?

Fathom Welcomes Meredith Fisher, MHA as Senior Consultant

We are thrilled to announce that Meredith Fisher, MHA, has joined Fathom Consulting as a senior consultant specializing in strategic execution and operations. Meredith has more than a decade of experience leading organizational change, with an approach that is deeply rooted in Lean thinking and enriched by the principles of human-centered design. She brings a passion for improving the experience of work for people in all settings.

Meredith joins Fathom from Allina Health, Abbott Northwestern Hospital, where she served as Senior Performance Improvement Advisor— partnering with leaders on initiatives such as process and workflow improvement, prioritization, and redesign of a strategic planning system. With Allina, and in other roles at the University of Minnesota and Hennepin Health, Meredith has focused her career on helping others drive change and increase organizational effectiveness.

“I’m excited to be joining Fathom at a time when more businesses are embracing human-centered design strategy,” Fisher says. “It’s already been inspiring to work with teammates and clients who share my passion for organizational leadership and change management.”

Meredith holds a Bachelor’s degree in Journalism and Strategic Communications from the University of Minnesota, as well as a Master’s degree in Healthcare Administration from the University of Minnesota School of Public Health. Learn more about Meredith on LinkedIn and join us in welcoming her to the Fathom Consulting team!

MIMA Scholarships: Celebrating the Next Generation of Digital Marketing

Our founder, Robin Carpenter, dedicated her career to mentoring young professionals and empowering everyone in the Twin Cities digital marketing community to do better. As a founding member of the Minnesota Interactive Marketing Association (MIMA)—the longest-standing digital marketing association in the country—Robin felt strongly that education and collaboration would aid the Twin Cities in developing talented digital professionals.

It is only fitting, then, that MIMA honors Robin’s legacy—and that of her contemporary, Jarrid Grams—with its annual MIMA scholarship, funded through contributions from Fathom Consulting. This year, the Carpenter family has underwritten one of three scholarships, a testament to how much her family believes in the work Robin began so many years ago.

The Jarrid Grams and Robin Carpenter Memorial Scholarship is available to undergraduate or graduate students pursuing careers in marketing, technology, communications, and math. To apply for this year’s scholarship, each student was asked to create a marketing plan for a fictitious company, incorporating budget, creative concepts, strategy, positioning, and digital executions.

As a long-time member and former president of MIMA—and close friends with both Robin and Jarrid—I have been privileged to serve on the committee that evaluates the student nominations and selects the recipients. I was blown away by this year’s student entrants, who demonstrated inventiveness, strategy, and vision beyond their years. Nothing makes me prouder than awarding these scholarships to our 2018 MIMA Scholars: Katie Coyne, Morgan Kuphal and Riley Plisek—right here at Fathom Consulting on June 6.

When I first got involved with MIMA, the Twin Cities was not recognized as a hotbed for digital marketing. Long considered “flyover country” by Silicon Valley, the digital marketing community was relatively disconnected. Thanks to the leadership of people like Robin, MIMA has helped create a unified community with a common goal of elevating the Twin Cities as a growth market for digital.

Today, students are finding their way into careers in the Twin Cities, thanks in part to MIMA giving them the education, networking connections and job leads they need to find interesting work and stay in our region. We hope this year’s scholarship recipients—and all of our past recipients—will share their success with others and contribute to our growing digital marketing community.

Students of any major are welcome to learn more and apply at http://mima.org/student-scholarship.

Fathom Consulting Among the Twin Cities’ 100 Best Companies to Work For

We’re thrilled to once again be named to the Minnesota Business list of the “100 Best Companies to Work For” in the Twin Cities. The award recognizes Minnesota’s top companies—as chosen by employee survey—for work environment, employee benefits, and overall employee happiness. How fun it was celebrate with other recipients at last night’s celebration at the Mall of America (as you can see by the laughter on our faces!).

While it’s an honor to be included in this year’s list, it’s not necessarily a surprise to us. Why?  Because feedback is a gift—and we’re constantly asking for it. Once every three months we conduct our ownemployee survey. And while we do get (and encourage) candid assessments, our team regularly agrees that Fathom Consulting is a great place to work.  Why?

  • We’re hard-working.We are devoted to doing the best for our clients every day. We take our work seriously (but don’t take ourselves too seriously!)
  • We’re empathetic. We care about our work, of course. But we also care deeply for each other.
  • We’re flexible. And that’s with each other and with our clients. We work where and when we have to. We adapt when the situation calls for it.
  • We’re transparent. We share everything, and foster a culture of open and honest communication.
  • We’re flat. We don’t do politics, hierarchy, or rank-pulling. We’re not here to claw our way to the top; we’re here to do great work together.
  • We’re part of the community. We share our knowledge, mentor budding talent, and volunteer for organizations that are meaningful to us.

And while these factors definitely make for a great employee experience, they also lend to the high-quality service we deliver to our clients. How do we know? In addition to surveying ourselves, we also survey our clients—after every project. As it turns out, hard work combined with a strong culture likes ours results in high client satisfaction as well. Everyone wins.

Ready to work with the best? Let’s connect!

Connect with Fathom Consulting at SDN Midwest June 15

It’s been fun to be part of small group of service design professionals who have started a Minnesota chapter of the Service Design Network, and I’m looking forward presenting at the first annual Service Design Network Midwest Conference in Minneapolis on Friday, June 15.

The theme of the conference is “Meaningful Connections,” and the day’s discussions will focus on how we can all design and deliver experiences that build stronger bonds between service providers and their users.

My presentation, “The Need for Connection Among Older Adults who are Aging in Place,” will delve deep into what connection really means to those in their golden years and how best to design services (with their valuable input) that meet their specific expectations and higher-order needs.

Other presentation topics will include service design and AI, ethics in design, and behavior change. Following the conference, attendees will take in the Minneapolis art scene at the annual Northern Spark arts festival. This year’s Northern Spark theme is “commonality,” a fantastic follow-on for SDN conference participants looking to delve deeper into the notion of connection in art, design, marketing, and user experience.

Service design in practice

Through collaboration with the local service design community, I’ve been able to practice unique methods to ensure that people are always at the center of not only how products are designedbut also how they are delivered, supported, and usedday-to-day. In fact, at the first few meetings of the local service design chapter, we used service design techniques like a Business Model Canvas to decide what “job” the organization would fulfill in our own lives.

This user-centered approach to service design is also reflected in the work we do at Fathom Consulting. As we approach service design projects with our clients, we are increasingly recommending facilitated co-creation exercises as a best practice. Co-creation is a process by which all stakeholders–particularly the recipients of the service–are at the table and making their voices heard. When the users of the service are in the room, you often arrive at unexpected ideas informed by diverse perspectives, and you ensure your solutions are tailored to their needs.

I always enjoy projects where we find unique ways to connect with users and look forward to connecting with other service designers to learn more about their experiences. I hope you can join us at the conference and connect with the budding local service design community as well!

Learn more about and register for the SDN Midwest Conference.

Our Work with the Women’s Health Leadership TRUST

“The best protector any woman can have, one that will serve her at all times and in all places, is courage.”

—Elizabeth Cady Stanton

I’m still riding high and feeling downright adventurous. A few weeks ago, we rounded up two tables full of fabulous women colleagues, clients and friends and joined a crowd of nearly 900 attendees at the Women’s Health Leadership TRUST’s annual Forum event in downtown Minneapolis. The TRUST is one of the largest regional membership groups dedicated to supporting women leaders in health care and includes executives, clinicians, policymakers, business owners and leaders in adjacent industries.

The theme for the evening was “courage,” which resonated loudly for me as an entrepreneur and small business owner. I was thrilled to finally have the chance to hear from a woman I’ve long followed and admired, arctic explorer Ann Bancroft. Ann did not disappoint, delivering a keynote speech that inspired us with stories of courageous adventure in the face of adversity. She also made us laugh along the way, reminding me of something I’ve long believed: it’s important to take your work, but not yourself, too seriously.

It was a treat to be at the event. We share the TRUST’s vision for courageous leadership and have a long history of active involvement with the organization, since joining as members in 2005. Since then, we’ve had two board members—company founder Robin Carpenter and principal consultant Allison O’Connor—take active leadership roles in the TRUST. We’re the creators and sponsors of the annual TRUST Mentor of the Year Award (go ahead, nominate someone this year!), and have twice facilitated the organization’s yearly strategic planning process.

As part of our ongoing strategy of engaging with thought leaders in the industries we serve, Fathom is proud to be actively working with the TRUST to advance best practices and new ideas for the women who are guiding the future of the health care industry every day. Together, we can continue to blaze new trails in a field where change seems to be the only constant.

User-Centered IoT: What’s in it for them?

This is the second blog post in our series about connectivity. Get caught up by starting with “Connecting the dots: Three big reasons businesses are thinking about IoT

Similar to other product improvement projects, adding connectivity to a product must take into account how your customers will feel about the capabilities. Will they find it beneficial to be connected or, on the other hand, see it as intrusive?

In our experience, we have seen organizations focusing on one of two user-facing benefits to “connecting” a product: 

Multi-Channel Access

Expanding access points — Enhancing connectivity to allow customers to access services or products in new ways, including omni- and multi-channel experiences from a variety of connected devices.

 

PDashboard wireframeroviding data to the user — Enhancing connectivity to provide data collected by a product back to the user of the product. In these cases, the hypothesis is that the data will provide some valuable insight to the user causing them to feel or act differently based on what they now know.

 

But even user-focused, well intentioned upgrades run the risk of users feeling that the added complexity (or cost) isn’t worth the proposed value. Like all hypotheses, your approach to connecting your product should be carefully tested with users—before spending time and money developing communications protocols to transmit the data, or programming analytics engines to generate insights. Below are several interesting research questions that are worth considering when thinking about providing data to users:

1. When customers view this data, what will they do differently because of it?

Customers will find it unhelpful to receive data they can do nothing about. Performing research to put sample data in front of customers and find out what, if anything, would cause them to take action is key to making a good connected product. Additional testing can determine whether the insights are useful, easy-to-understand, and delivered at an appropriate frequency.

Pay careful attention to providing users with insights too late to be useful. If a restaurant finds out their refrigerator was running too warm seven days after the food in it was already served to customers, they might be more frustrated than if they had never known at all.

Also consider whether it would be beneficial for the product to take the next logical action for the customer. Rather than notifying a homeowner that their lights are on and nobody’s home, why not just shut them off?

2. What is the full picture of data that would need to exist to drive this action?

Often, usage data alone may not provide adequate insight to trigger an action. But when combined with additional data from another source, the insight becomes clear and actionable. Find out from users what other relevant data is available to them, and how you could combine it with your data for maximum utility. For example, telling a surgeon only how many rubber gloves she used is just about as useful as telling her how many gallons of gas her car consumed. Without being able to see how this information correlates with the number of surgeries performed, your customers won’t be able to tell if their usage is appropriate or changing over time.

3. What is the best way for the user to receive the data?

Most users will prefer to consume information in a place they are already going rather than bounce between several disparate systems. If they aren’t regularly accessing the product for data and insights now, it’s unlikely they will in the future (unless it is a very unique and compelling insight!). For example, many medical remote monitoring companies are now integrating device data with their customers’ existing electronic medical record software, rather than delivering it by bespoke hardware monitors or one-off web portals.

4. What are the user’s boundaries when it comes to data privacy?

It’s important to understand where your users will draw the line about allowing a device to capture data about them. Even if the data can be used to provide a clear value, if seen as too invasive, adoption could be limited. Telling a marathoner how many miles she’s put on her shoes might be great, but if the data also reveals what time and exactly where she is running, she may feel it could put her in a potentially dangerous situation.

5. How does being connected change the service model?

Users can help define if connected device experiences are additional touchpoints or replacement touchpoints. They can also point to ways that being connected could enhance or empower existing touchpoints. For example, field sales calls may remain a primary touchpoint, but sales reps could be provided with more tailored sales recommendations customized to the way the customer is using the product.

Ready to implement?

Once the business objectives and user experience goals are thoroughly analyzed, there are some important things to consider about how the connections get built and implemented. None of the strategy and research methods we’ve covered so far are all that different from other product and service design efforts, but in our final installment we’ll cover four unique questions that we feel are critical for connectivity project teams to consider prior to implementation.

If you’re interested in more information about user research with connectivity ideas, this post was also the basis for a recent presentation to TC UX Meetup.

Connecting the dots: Three big reasons businesses are thinking about IoT

During a recent happy hour gathering of Fathom Consulting colleagues, a few of us realized a common thread running through several otherwise unrelated projects. It seemed that, all of a sudden, many of our clients had been bitten by the “connectivity” bug.  Though diverse across industries, products, and services, many of our clients were actively exploring ways and reasons to allow their standalone products to communicate—to each other, to the cloud or data hub, and, in some cases, directly to users.

An active discussion ensued: What had we learned across these projects that we could share with product and program owners who might be considering connectivity solutions in the near future? Thus, a blog series was born.  (Watch for two more posts in the near future!)

But first, a few definitions

Internet of Things (IoT) refers to the networking of physical things (often referred to as “smart devices”) in order to collect and exchange data. Some products we’ve worked with include medical devices, inventory control tags, and consumer goods.

A simpler, but related, concept is that of “connected devices.” Connected devices send or receive data to at least one other device. They might use Internet protocols to make the exchange (making them part of the IoT), or they might just be connected directly to one other device (for example, a monitor on a patient that communicates via Bluetooth to a monitor across the room).

These days the terms are used almost interchangeably. For these blog posts, we’re sticking with the broader label of “connected devices”—since most of the points we want to make are relevant whether or not the device is truly part of the IoT.

“Connectivity is the tool, not the target”

Let’s start off with the obvious way that this latest technological capability is identical to all the others that came before it.  Just like getting on the web in the late ‘90s and getting on social media 10  years ago was unwise unless you had a valid reason to do so, pursuing a connectivity solution just for the sake of it is just as likely to leave product owners feeling disappointed, foolish, and poor. Like all successful innovations, a move into a connected landscape must be underpinned by solid business and user objectives. We’ll explore three good business reasons to get connected in this post and user benefits in the next post.

1. Provide efficient service and effective support

Traditionally, products that have shipped and are in the hands of users can be hard to maintain. The user has to do their own maintenance, and troubleshooting often involves frustrating phone calls to 1-800 numbers.

But products that have shipped and are connected can more easily be maintained and repaired by a remote update. Rather than a service technician being deployed when things break down, fixes or version updates can be pushed to a user’s device via the Internet. The company saves time and money, and the user is back up and running much faster.

Combine the ability to service products remotely with increased visibility into how the product is operating, and it may be possible to proactively solve a problem before the user is even aware there is one. Connectivity can not only prevent things from going wrong, but also make sure things go right. As an example, Tesla Motors recently pushed an update to its cars allowing drivers in Florida to drive more miles between battery charges as they evacuated prior to the arrival of Hurricane Irma.

Even in cases in which a physical product must be fixed in person, the benefits of a company communicating with its products can still be realized. Data received from the device ahead of time could be used to diagnose the problem and ensure the dispatched technician has the correct tools, parts, and expertise to complete the job.

2. Gather data on product usage

When sitting down to discuss how a product could be improved or what features should make the cut-off for the next launch, we consistently counsel our clients to consider how their users use the product today. It makes more sense to spend design and development capital on important experiences that a re frequently used or difficult rather than upgrading features that no one knows exist. Yet often our clients have to make educated guesses or spend time on baseline research just to understand what, exactly, their customers are doing with their products.

But when products in the field are connected and communicating usage data, suddenly insights about problem areas or underutilized features are readily available. These insights can inform product design and feature lists in a way analogous to web analytics. When combined with additional information the device might collect on the location, time, and the user’s identity, this data can even serve as the foundation of a robust persona or inform an audience-specific design process.

In addition, usage information could empower others at the company who interface with the user. Perhaps a certain user needs additional training on advanced features or is operating the product in an unethical or inefficient way that should be addressed. If the inventory of consumable products can be captured and transmitted, then sales calls or promotions could be expertly timed.

3. Define new service and revenue models

The ability to provide more options for serving and charging your customers increases exponentially once a physical product is connecting in real time. Rather than a monthly service fee, customers could pay for each time or day they use the product. These options could be attractive to customers who otherwise would not have purchased the product, believing that they wouldn’t use it enough to justify the subscription fees (similar to the pay-as-you-go mobile phones).

Leasing models on connected products could now include low, medium, or high-usage plans, or advanced features could be immediately enabled after payment of an upgrade cost—akin to web apps like Google Drive or SurveyMonkey. This gives the makers of physical products new ways to get their foot in the door with customers at a lower price point. Costly medical monitoring equipment or seldom-used safety equipment could follow the path of tiered pricing models set out by digital-only companies like Hulu, or sell packages of concurrent users like Adobe.

Instead of connecting with customers a few times a year via in-person visits or phone calls, you could have literally hundreds of small touchpoints with them each month as they interact with you via the product. This could drastically change the closeness of the service relationship, while saving the business money on a costly field sales and service team.

Need more reasons?

These benefits to the business may be reason enough for many organizations to see the value in getting connected. Basic back-of-the-napkin math on increased sales or savings from more efficient service is often enough to justify the investment in getting connected. But remember—we’ve only covered the internal benefits here! Next time we’ll explore how to create connected solutions users will love, too.