Fathom Consulting hosts InnovateHer Challenge for Minnesota

Fathom Consulting hosts InnovateHer Challenge for Minnesota

Last week we had the pleasure of welcoming over 60 healthcare innovators in the community to our office in the North Loop for the Minnesota instance of the InnovateHer Challenge. This challenge, sponsored by the Small Business Association seeks to “unearth innovative products and services that help impact and empower the lives of women and their families”. Winners from regional competitions such as this one may be selected as semi-finalists to compete for cash prizes totaling $70,000.

Healthcare.MN, a collaborative community of innovators and thinkers passionate about healthcare, put out the call for participants and sixteen entered. Each participant had three minutes to convince a panel of judges (including our own Kate McRoberts) that their innovative product:

• Will (or is) filling an authentic need in the marketplace;
• Can (or does) impact and empower women and their families; and
• Has the potential for commercialization.

Throughout the evening challengers gave incredible pitches on everything from cooling caps to prevent hair loss during chemo to simple EMRs for clinicians in developing countries and business appropriate clothing tailor-made for muscular female crossfit enthusiasts. Many pitches had a wonderful personal story as inspiration, including a pitch to create a fitness and empowerment program for residents of a women’s shelter, or a discreet wristband that gives haptic feedback to allow the user to break bad habits such as trichotillomania (or hair pulling).
In the end the panel of judges declared Molly Fuller the winner. Molly’s business, Molly Fuller Design is currently working to create stylish clothing for children and teens with autism and sensory integration needs. The designs will use deep pressure therapy techniques of weight and compression to relieve anxiety due to sensory overload. Molly’s preparedness, humor, and personal story make her a strong contender for the national prize.

Fathom Consulting Open House

Have you heard? We’ve moved!

You may already know that Evantage became Fathom Consulting in February. (We’re still getting used to saying it, too.) While we love our new name and logo, we’re also excited about our great new space, and we’d love to share it with you.

Come on over!

Please join us for food, drinks, and fun at our spring open house.

When:

May 4, 2017
5-8 PM

Where:

The Bradshaw Building
108 North Washington Ave
Suite 400

Parking: There is street parking and several parking lots and ramps within a few blocks.

RSVP and Let Us Know If You’re Coming

 

Evantage is now Fathom Consulting

MINNEAPOLIS  (January 31, 2017) — Evantage Consulting, a Minneapolis-based business consultancy that has been serving the Twin Cities for nearly 20 years, today announced that they will be starting the new year with a makeover that includes both a name change and a new office location.

The tide of evolution began in 2015 when the firm founder, Robin Carpenter, unexpectedly passed away and Kate McRoberts, former minority partner, assumed ownership. A few months later, former Carlson Rezidor and McCann Worldgroup executive, Rachael Marret, joined the firm as managing director, and Bret Busse was promoted to senior vice president of operations.

“The name Evantage was coined when the firm was founded in 1999 when the Internet was becoming mainstream and adding an ‘e’ was the thing to do,” said McRoberts, “After nearly 18 years, we felt it is time for an update as we mark a next step in our evolution. We specialize in helping clients capitalize on periods of change, and now it’s our turn.”

Starting this week, Evantage will be known as Fathom Consulting, (consultfathom.com). “We believe our new name more keenly signifies what we have always done best for our clients: delving deeper, asking tougher questions, and helping to bring understanding to their most complex business challenges,” explained Marret. “After talking to our clients about what sets us apart, we have also adopted a new tagline: ‘From complexity to confidence’ that expresses our ability to unravel and solve some of their toughest strategic, operational and customer experience challenges.”

Along with a fresh face, the firm has also moved to a fresh office space in the North Loop, just two downtown blocks from its former Colonial Warehouse location on Third Avenue North to the historic Bradshaw Building at 108 N. Washington Avenue. The relocation gave the firm a chance to design its own collaborative workspace and integrate its new branding of Fathom Consulting.

Stop Visualizing Data!

You work in a small company that has a program to help consumers manage their health. Your basic product involves a mobile app for tracking daily events and a personalized dashboard. For a monthly subscription users can also get access to coaching and other resources.

There’s a meeting with a potential investor on the calendar and you want to use data to support your story that things are going well. So, you open up Excel and start digging through the data you have.

Finding the Story

You got some nice local news coverage back in March and you signed your first partnership in June, both of which resulted in a spike of app downloads. So, you look at that.

1-downloads

Well, that’s something, but it doesn’t really communicate the excitement of the last few months. You remember that a lot of those downloads in the spring never turned into even free accounts. So, you decide to look at new accounts instead of downloads.

2-accounts

That looks more like what you were expecting. Whereas the app downloads spiked in March, the new accounts hit a peak in July. Comparing the two graphs, you become curious as to how many new accounts were linked to the news coverage and the partnership, so you draw another graph.

3-new-accounts-source

This view makes it clear that by the time the July peak hit, the effect of the news story had died. The big spike in July was just the partnership. You kind of knew this, but it’s the first time you’ve seen a picture of it, which is pretty cool.

You remember that your company has a 20% download-to-account conversion target, and you want to see how many of these months hit that. This seems like a good situation for a scatter plot:

4-scatter

Wow. Comparing against the diagonal line that represents the 20% target, you can see July and August blew it away, while March and April didn’t even come close.

You note another promising detail on the spreadsheet. Not only are accounts up, but the percentage of accounts that are paid subscriptions is rising as well. This is good for revenue, which investors obviously care about.

5-percentage-paid

You wonder how many of the paid accounts come from the new partnership, so you look at that.

6-number-paid-by-source

Clearly, the partnership has been a great thing for your company. Armed with these insights you put together a nice summary in dashboard form for your investor. You add a few other interesting tidbits (you know from your market researcher that about two-thirds of your paid account holders are women) to make it visually interesting.

7-dashboard

When you walk a few of your colleagues through it you get some nice comments—this is the first time some of them have seen all this information together like this—but when you present it the following day, your potential investor squints at the wall and tries to figure out what’s going on

Visualize Situations, Not Data

When you start by looking at the data you have and concentrate on how to draw a picture of it, it’s easy to lose track of the message. Overwhelming your audience with data is an easy trap to fall into. The person crafting a dashboard (or an article, or a presentation, or a web page) knows the content backwards and forwards and can unconsciously assume that the audience is on the same page.

A graph is a picture of a situation. The trick to creating a good one is to start by identifying a situation that your audience cares about. In some cases, you may know. Your investors probably care more about revenue (and projected growth) than they do about specific conversion rates.

8-revenue

This graph describes a situation that investors will understand: Revenue is going up due to a partnership, and more partnerships and more revenue are on the way.

Often you won’t know what situations your audience cares about, even when you think you do. A clinician who is monitoring a heart failure population may not need to know about her patient’s every movement but does care if he has become less active over the past few days. A credit card customer looks at a breakdown of his purchases out of idle curiosity, but what he really wants to know is how he can maximize the frequent flyer miles he earns by using his card. A patient doesn’t understand what her deductible is, but she does want to know which insurance plan is going to cost her less over the coming year.

It’s not fair to throw data at people and expect them to decode it. Just as with any design, effective data visualization requires you to understand the situations that are significant to your audience. By starting there, you can use data to describe something they will care about.

Evantage Consulting accepts national challenge to redesign medical bills

MINNEAPOLIS (August 12, 2016) – Evantage Consulting, a business consultancy that helps organizations capitalize on change and how they interact with their customers, announced today they are a participant in a national challenge from the Obama administration to design a medical bill consumers can understand.

The Department of Health and Human Services and AARP sponsored the challenge to encourage health care organizations, designers, digital tech companies and other innovators to design a medical bill that’s simpler and easier for patients to understand, and to improve patients’ experience of the overall medical billing process. The “A Bill You Can Understand” design and innovation challenge is intended to solicit new approaches and draw national attention to a common complaint with the health care system: that medical billing is a source of confusion for patients and families.

“Entering this challenge was a natural for us,” explained Kate McRoberts, Evantage managing partner. “We have been designing outside-in, customer-centric experiences on behalf of our numerous health care client partners since we established our business in 1999.”

Jeff Harrison, senior user experience consultant, led the effort beginning with internal ideation sessions with Evantage health care consultants, researchers and user experience experts. “Life is full of surprises. Some surprises are great, but when it comes to your health, a surprise usually means that you have a problem on your hands,” said Harrison. “As we approached this challenge, we decided to look at the entire patient billing journey and felt it was critical to bring the patient voice into the design. So we conducted input sessions with patients who have dealt with medical bills for themselves or family members.”

Evantage’s entry included a written design brief, patient journey map, visual layouts and video explaining their approach. Winners will be announced at the Health 2.0 fall conference in September in Santa Clara. Two $5,000 prizes will be awarded; one for “easiest bill to understand” and the other for its “transformational approach.”

ABOUT EVANTAGE CONSULTING

Established in 1999, Evantage is a business consultancy that helps organizations capitalize on change and how they interact with customers. Clients engage them as proven partners in unraveling and solving strategic, operational, and customer experience challenges. Evantage proudly serves leading companies such as Medtronic, 3M Healthcare, Optum Health, General Mills, and John Deere. www.consultfathom.com

Practicing Divergent and Convergent Thinking: Destination Imagination

For the past five years I’ve been coaching my kids and several of their classmates as they compete in the Destination Imagination (DI) challenge program. The program offers seven different open-ended challenges that allow kids to learn about creativity and innovation by experiencing the design process firsthand. This year’s program culminated last week at the global tournament in Nashville.

One of the key tasks facing any DI coach each year is helping the team understand what type of thinking is called for at different parts during the challenge season. At the beginning of the season, the team needs to brainstorm as many different potential solutions as possible. Then, once they have a rough outline of what they want to accomplish, participants need to focus on executing their solution efficiently and creatively. By following the design process through divergent and convergent thinking they arrive at the tournament prepared to win.

Work with our clients at Evantage also allows us to practice divergent and convergent thinking on a regular basis. Our clients often approach us with a need to design products, processes, or services that meet certain user needs or solve challenges facing a particular type of customer.

Traditionally, design thinking relies on two separate rounds of divergent and convergent thinking. The first round begins by thinking about all the possible drivers of a problem and ends by defining a discrete problem on which to focus. The second round begins with ideating as many potential solutions as possible and ends with focusing on finding the best solution through testing and iteration. (Unlike most work with our clients, however—where the first round often takes a great deal of time to research and complete—the DI challenge program gives us the problem, defined in great detail, so we skip to ideation.)

Design Thinking Cycle

 

Encouraging Divergent Thinking

Divergent thinking—where we try to understand all possible drivers of the problem and imagine all possible solutions— is the place where creative types thrive. Yet many of us are deeply uncomfortable with this type of thinking. In school we are taught to come up with “correct” answers and may have few opportunities to exercise our innovation muscles. But anyone can be a good divergent thinker with practice and the right setting. Here are some techniques that encourage divergent thinking:

1) Warm up properly. To get folks comfortable with shouting out any idea that pops in their head, I often start with an “alphabet brainstorm.” In this exercise I hand a common household item—like a lightbulb, a pillowcase, or a birthday candle—to small teams of two or three people. I then give them three minutes to come up with 26 uses for the item, one for each letter of the alphabet. Once one person has shouted out something as silly as, “You could yodel into it!”, they’ll be ready to stop censoring all of their ideas before they make it out into the open.

2) Keep things moving. When facilitating an idea generation session, make sure each idea is brief. When one brainstormer starts elaborating and explaining her idea, it’s common for others in the room to converge around that solution and abandon their own divergent thinking efforts. For example, at a DI team meeting this fall, each member’s “pitch” for a mystery play the team would write and perform could only contain a two-word description of the time period, the names and professions of the three main characters, and a concise description of the crime that was committed. (It was like our own version of Professor Plum in the Library with the Lead Pipe!).

3) Level the playing field. Similarly, if one idea seems more “baked” than others, team members may focus on that idea at the exclusion of others too early in the process. Using design studio techniques or having team members sketch storyboards works well to force people to communicate their ideas at the same level of fidelity.

4) Quality is still king. Often, too much focus is placed on the sheer number of ideas generated during a brainstorm. Instead, look for a small number of truly novel ideas, or ways that traditional ideas could be combined in new and interesting ways. To encourage this, I lead the team in “pile on” brainstorming in which someone begins an idea and each person thereafter stretches it just a little bit further. For example, one person might say, “What if our vehicle had a rudder to steer?”; the next person might add, “Yes, and the rudder could be connected to a pair of handlebars”; and a third person might add, “We could mount a walkie talkie to the handlebars so the driver can easily talk to the navigator.” And so on.

Effectively Practicing Convergent Thinking

As the project progresses, convergent thinking takes over and the team focuses on efficiently executing their chosen ideas. Unlike the lateral jumps and unexpected connections of divergent thinking, convergent thinking is relatively linear (e.g., first we sand the rudder and then we attach it to the vehicle) and often there is one best answer. Here are some tips for narrowing in on the best solution:

1) Try it out. In many cases, hands-on experimentation and iteration are required to find the best solution (e.g., the walkie talkie won’t stay attached and if we just tape it on, we can no longer change the batteries, but we could build a holster from duct tape and cradle the walkie talkie in it). Have extra materials on hand so you can prototype ideas to see if they work, rather than just talking about them. Each time a production method doesn’t work, teammates must come together to think up new solutions to move forward (some of the same methods listed above may help).

2) Fail fast. Failing fast means doing the least amount of work you can do to find out if an idea is feasible or not. Don’t build an entire product when testing a prototype will tell you if meets the users’ needs, and don’t ever spend more than a week of working without testing something out.

3) Avoid backsliding. At this stage, having teammates who continue to practice divergent thinking can be troublesome. With the tournament (or, in real life, perhaps a code freeze) a few weeks away, it becomes disruptive to say, “Wait, maybe we should build a hovercraft instead!”

4) Embrace project management. The basic tools for managing convergent thinking are well-known to most of us. Create a timeline with milestones, call out dependencies, and plan what materials and tools you will need along the way. This will ensure smooth progress from idea to solution.

 

Celebrating Your Solution

On launch day, or tournament day, it’s time to put it all out on the table and execute flawlessly. A team that has spent dedicated time in the first divergent and convergent thinking cycle can feel confident that they are solving a well-understood problem. If they’ve also practiced convergent and divergent thinking in the second cycle they will arrive with the absolute best solution possible. It’s time to celebrate by raising a cupcake or a pint of beer, as appropriate to your team’s age!

Learn More about Designing for the Caring Professions

I’m excited to have the opportunity to speak at the Healthcare.MN monthly meet-up on June 13th  I will be providing an in-depth look into what it’s like to work on the front lines of healthcare and social services as a caring professional, based on nearly 200 individual interviews conducted over the last two years.

We will begin by understanding the unique mindset, environmental challenges, and information expectations that shape how nurses, social workers, and allied health professionals approach their work. The interactive presentation will also provide attendees ample opportunity to practice new research methods and meet others in the group. Lastly we will discuss concrete guidelines to help those who are designing products, services, or applications for this specialized user group to maximize the effectiveness of their solutions.

Hope to see you there!

When: Monday, June 13th from 5 pm – 7:30 pm

Where: 1625 Hennepin Ave, Minneapolis

REGISTRATION

The Five Cs of Consulting

5cs-wordcloudConsulting can be an extremely rewarding, yet challenging, career choice. When I think about the characteristics of the consultants I’m fortunate enough to work with, five Cs become clear:

  1. Candor. We’re incredibly honest with each other and our clients. One of our consultants summed it up when she recently said she’d rather work where people are candid rather than where everyone is simply nice. And a client once introduced us to his new boss by saying we’re “in the business of having difficult conversations.” We constantly question our approach, findings, and recommendations, asking “Is there a better way?” We review each other’s deliverables and expect to get them back marked up with lots of edits. We do dry runs of twenty minute presentations and then get an hour of feedback. Most importantly, we do all this with the utmost respect. It’s never about putting anyone down — it’s about constantly pushing all of us up.

 

  1. Continuous improvement. We’re constantly looking for new ideas and ways to solve problems. We strive to consistently demonstrate curiosity, listen, learn, and think holistically and proactively share our knowledge and insights with each other and our clients. Through our work with clients of all sizes from start-up to Fortune 50 and across many industries, we glean insights that can be applied in new and unique ways.

 

  1. Collaboration. We know we are stronger when we work together. We have very diverse educational and professional backgrounds, but very similar analytical minds. This makes for some really robust conversations and revealing get-to-know-you icebreaker-question answers. This level of interaction produces results none of us could on our own.

 

  1. Competition. We have a bunch of type-A personalities. When something can turn into a contest or a race, it will. While this is easy to witness during our internal events (scavenger hunts, Amazing Race, Cutthroat Kitchen, curling, lawn bowling, basketball pools …), I think this contributes to the quality of our work too. We see one of our coworkers create a great findings and recommendations report or final presentation and immediately start asking how we can do it even better next time. It’s not about making the other person lose — it’s about making all of us win.

 

  1. Comradery. We actually like each other (it’s true). We work hard and play hard together and have fun doing it. Knowing we’re all in this together and working toward the same goal makes it easier to work hard and to give and receive feedback, even when the work itself or the message is difficult.

 

Every firm has its own culture and keys to success, but it always comes down to the consultants themselves. They make the firm climb, chug along, or crawl. Here’s to a continuous climb. Cheers!

TreeHouse Health Adds Evantage Consulting as a Service Provider Partner

MINNEAPOLIS (May 16, 2016) – TreeHouse Health, an innovation center designed to invest in emerging healthcare companies and help accelerate their growth, announces the addition of a Service Provider Partner, Evantage Consulting, a business consultancy that helps healthcare and health technology organizations capitalize on change and how they interact with their customers.

“Our ecosystem is designed to help our portfolio companies gain traction in the marketplace and grow their businesses. To do that, we look to partner with leading organizations that see the value and opportunity in working with emerging healthcare companies and can aid in their growth. With over 17 years of deep industry experience, Evantage brings a unique and valuable perspective to TreeHouse Health,” said J.D. Blank, Managing Director at TreeHouse Health.

“Our mission at Evantage Consulting is to partner with our clients and community to affect meaningful change,” explained Rachael Marret, Evantage Managing Director. “Evantage has long been an active participant in the Twin Cities healthcare community and this partnership with TreeHouse Health is a great opportunity for us to lend support to emerging companies that will further advance this market as leaders in healthcare and health technology.”

As a Service Provider Partner at TreeHouse Health, Evantage will serve as an excellent resource to the Portfolio Companies. Evantage will participate in an educational event at TreeHouse Health in December and plans to host workshops for the Portfolio Companies throughout the year.

About TreeHouse Health LLC
TreeHouse Health, established in 2013, is an innovation center that helps emerging healthcare companies accelerate the growth and development of their business within and innovative and collaborative ecosystem by providing investment and expertise. To date, TreeHouse Health has invested in twelve early-stage healthcare companies and has two Anchor Tenant relationships with Hennepin County Medical Center (HCMC) and Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Minnesota (BCBS). To learn more, visit TreeHouse-Health.com.

About Evantage Consulting
Evantage Consulting is a business consultancy that helps organizations capitalize on change and how they interact with their customers. Clients engage them as proven partners in unraveling and solving strategic, operational, and customer/patient experience challenges. They serve Fortune 500 to startup companies, including providers, payers, pharmacy benefit managers, and medical device manufacturers. Established in 1999, Evantage has a long-standing legacy of driving business outcomes through unrelenting customer focus, digital expertise, and operations know-how.

The Importance of New

Last year, my friend Bill proposed we run the Pikes Peak Ascent, a half marathon up, you guessed it, Pikes Peak. The race description itself was daunting: Elevation gain of 7,815′, starting at 6,300′ and finishing at 14,115’ with an average grade of 11%; the trail is narrow and winding with gravel, rocks and dirt and includes sharp turns and abrupt changes in elevation and direction. After a few seconds of consideration, I said I was in.

We’ve both run marathons (Bill many more than me) along with 50k and 50 mile ultras, so we have some experience, but we knew this was going to be completely different, especially since we live at 900’ in Minnesota.

Pikes Peak Marathon Course

Google Earth view of the Ascent and Marathon course.

 

We did as much as we could to prepare (Bill much more than me), but really went into it pretty blind. We both made it to the top (Bill far ahead of me) and as we conbret-bill-pikes-peakgratulated each other on the achievement I was tremendously thankful to have such a good friend, pardon the pun, push me to such new heights.

Once my endorphins settled down and I had time to reflect, it was clear something truly special had just happened. I concluded the reason this was such a big deal was because it was a completely new experience and it’s been quite a while since I’ve done something this new. Running at altitude, the 11% grade, the terrain, the smell of the Bristlecone Pine trees — it was all different than anything I’d come across in the past. And it was exhilarating.

Obviously it’s not realistic to experience something this dramatic throughout the year, but I do think it’s important to consistently encounter and tackle new challenges. The opportunity to do this is what draws many of us to consulting, especially the work we do at Evantage.

New problems force us to come up with new solutions.

A canned or cookie-cutter approach won’t be enough. We have to explore new ways of thinking and constantly ask if there is a better way.

New environments sometimes put us in uncomfortable situations.

We have to be flexible and willing to take risks, and trust our colleagues to do the same. I believe the quote goes something like, “You have to get comfortable with discomfort.”

New relationships cause us to look at ourselves.

What can I learn from this person? Does she possess qualities I admire and can try to emulate? Does he possess qualities I dislike and want to avoid myself?

Conquering something new inspires us to ask, “What’s next?”

Once we’ve solved the puzzle and know we’ve delivered exactly what our client needs, we’re ready to continue on to the next challenge — often for the same client.

New keeps us on our toes. We’re never sure what’s around the corner, but we know we can handle it.

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